You’re sitting in your cubicle when the phone rings, it’s your boss. He wants to speak with you immediately, and he doesn’t sound happy. What could it be? You finished that proposal on time, early in fact; you thought you won over those foreign executives in the presentation, but maybe not. You walk along the endless hallway, slowly, one foot in front of the other; you cross the office threshold and feel your palms begin to sweat. You slowly take a seat in one the tall leather wingback chairs. Your heart begins to race, you can barely breath, and look down to notice your knuckles are turning white from grasping the arms rests. Your boss leans forward and begins to speak. As he continues you begin to relax. It’s good news! He wants to offer you a promotion. All your hard work and long hours have finally paid off. But wait. The promotion will require relocation to Canada. How are you going to make this decision?

You do your research and here’s what you find out about Canada.
Canada is known to be an attractive country for expats. The governments open immigration policy is globally known, and the country itself was largely built by immigrants. In Canada you can expect to find multicultural communities, who are welcoming to those from abroad. Canada is the second largest country in the world so there is an abundance of space for mixtures of metropolitan and rural communities. People are not only relocating to Canada because of the great lifestyle, but because they can no longer afford to stay where they are. While other global currencies like the American dollar and the EURO have decreased in recent years the Canadian dollar has stayed strong. Obviously Canada breeds the best hockey players and funniest comedians, but the reason Canadians and immigrants love to live in Canada is the support, security, safety and opportunity that the land brings. The real draw to Canada is the affordable housing and healthcare!

Now that you’ve discovered how great Canada is what else should you consider before your move.
First and foremost you must consider the cost. You need to figure out the difference in living costs including housing, commuting, entertainment, and food expenses. Many career development specialists advise against changing jobs without a pay raise of 30 percent or more, especially if it involves relocation. Consider your trailing spouse and the time it may take them to find a new job. You may have to live off of one income for a period of time until you are both settled in new positions. If you have kids think about the neighborhood and the schools that they can attend in the area. Make sure you properly prepare your children as they may feel stress or anxiety about the move, especially with leaving their friends and activities behind. Understand your new retirement plan and extended health coverage with the company as it will probably change with your new position, and new location. Once you’ve decided that relocation is right for you and your family, negotiate the terms of your relocation with your company. Many employers provide benefits to relocating workers on a case-by-case basis. Financial benefits to request can include family counseling, vacation time after the move, a job or job-search assistance for a spouse, and assistance selecting a community and school district. Request to work with a relocation specialist in the city you’re moving to. They’ll be able to show properties, help you settle in, deal with all official paperwork, and make your move stress free and enjoyable.

Always remember ‘know when to say no.’ If the relocation terms are not suitable for you and your family you can decline the relocation and stay right where you are!